Sleep Treatments

 

Many times lifestyle and behavior modifications can help patients with sleep-related disorders. These may involve dietary changes, weight-modification techniques, relaxation techniques and other stress-reducers. When these are not effective, there are a number of non-surgical treatments that may be beneficial, including:

Oral Appliances

Oral appliances can be worn in the mouth at night to help quiet snoring and to treat mild cases of sleep apnea. These devices come in many shapes and styles. Some hold the whole jaw slightly forward, while others hold the tongue forward to keep it from blocking the throat. If an oral device is right for you, you will first go through a sleep study, and then be referred to a specially trained dentist for an examination and fitting. It is important to work closely with your doctor and dental professional to find the device that best meets your needs.

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

If the initial nocturnal polysomnogram ​shows a significant breathing disorder during sleep, such as sleep apnea, a second study is sometimes requested to evaluate the response to CPAP treatment. CPAP is a method of delivering pressurized air through a nasal mask which prevents the airway from closing during sleep. Air can then flow freely to and from the lungs. CPAP has a high success rate in treating obstructive sleep apnea, restoring normal sleep patterns, and eliminating daytime fatigue and sleepiness.

CPAP Troubleshooting Sessions

If the initial nocturnal polysomnogram ​shows a significant breathing disorder during sleep, such as sleep apnea, a second study is sometimes requested to evaluate the response to CPAP treatment. CPAP is a method of delivering pressurized air through a nasal mask which prevents the airway from closing during sleep. Air can then flow freely to and from the lungs. CPAP has a high success rate in treating obstructive sleep apnea, restoring normal sleep patterns, and eliminating daytime fatigue and sleepiness.

Bi-Level Positive Pressure

Bi-level positive pressure provides two different pressure levels for breathing in and out, and may be more comfortable for patients who have had difficulty tolerating CPAP.

When a patient is unable to tolerate CPAP, a doctor may recommend surgery. Several surgical options can treat sleep-related breathing problems. Most surgeries make the airway larger by tightening or removing structures in the throat. Other procedures unblock the nose or reposition the jaw.

Location Information

To schedule an appointment, please call 

855-546-1154

 

MedStar Harbor Hospital
3001 South Hanover St.
Baltimore, MD 21225